Instructors

Text Box: Parawild Edu-Capture

Andre Pienaar

Donald Strydom

Brian Jones

Roy Bengis

Brian is in charge of and works at Moholoholo Rehabilitation Center.  Animals that have been injured are cared for here to hopefully be re-released back into the wild.  Animals that are unable to be released are kept to educate the general public about conservation and the species itself.

 

 

Andre considers his work a passion, not just an occupation. He started Parawild Game Capture in 1993, integrating classes with game capture in 1999. Andre has worked with world renowned veterinarians and enjoys giving students hands on experience while teaching them about conservation, drugs used in immobilization, and how the game capture business works.

Dr. Bengis graduated from the University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort in 1971 with a BVSc.  After interning at the University of Pennsylvania, he attended the University of Mississippi and received his MSc in Physiology and Pharmacology and subsequently his PhD in Physiology.  In 1978, Dr. Bengis returned to South Africa and became a State Veterinarian at Kruger National Park where he currently has the rank of Chief State Veterinarian.  Dr. Bengis has authored or co-authored more than sixty-six scientific publications and is Africa’s representative to the O.I.E. Working Group on Wildlife Diseases.  Having a special interest in wildlife disease epidemiology and chemical immobilization of free-ranging wild mammals, Dr. Bengis lectures on the role these topics play in a unique ecosystem such as the Kruger National Park.

In 1984, Donald founded the Swadini Reptile Park (now called Khamai Reptile Park) to aid in the conservation of reptiles, amphibians, spiders, and scorpions through education and research.  The park hosts lectures to numerous organizations as well as the general public.  Research at the Khamai Reptile Park involves venom research, field studies, and the husbandry of reptiles.  Through the park, Donald has established a reptile conservation project called HerP (Help Endangered Reptile Project) aimed at the conservation and propagation of rare and endangered species.  To his credit, Donald has been involved in many expeditions to locate and catalog new and endangered species of reptiles in countries such as Zimbabwe, Namibia, Mauritius, Zaire, Zambia and Mexico, made appearances on programs for the BBC, National Geographic and the Discovery Channel, and has been involved in the creation of three popular books on snakes.  Donald takes our students behind the scenes to learn first hand how to capture, handle, and care for African snakes in the unique world of reptile rehabilitation and release.